DORIS

She was a blazing star, luminescent and full of life.  She was born in one sunny afternoon of September 11, 1955, a Sunday, at St. Jude Hospital in Sampaloc, Manila and as soon as she began to walk, a couple of summers later, she was already reading and writing.  As soon as she could define colors and numbers, she was into honing up on her reasoning.  She was my younger and my only sister, Doris, already showing her genius at an early age.  She was never ordinary despite her effort to remain one.  She was always outstanding in every way she would turn herself.  She was the center whenever challenge had been determined.  She was almost a goddess, not only for us, members of her family, but in every organization where she would get involved with.

 

I remembered when we were in our teens and I was considering seriously entering a bicycle race.  She took our bike and gave all the boys in the neighborhood a scary challenge.  All of us were using a racing medium and there she was in a simple tool and at the end of the tour, she was almost in the lead.  She complained to me later that her legs felt like it was as big as my torso already!  We had a good laugh at that time but her girlish ways evolved into a fine lady of the academe.  She never relished any activity where she would witness her brother to lose.  But age caught up and we were separated not only in school but also in persuasion.

 

My sister wanted to study, to read books and show her mettle in the classroom.  On the other hand, I would get into street corner bantering, read behavior and show my mettle in violence.  She never had any occasion to see the streets.  She was more at home in the library, accustomed in front of her class, confident in research and used to serious discussions.  She was more familiar in theoretical analysis and quite poor in judging reality.  She literally grew up appreciating concepts than ascertaining that which goes around her environment.

 

She accepted that which was always offered to her, she was a bit vulnerable and gullible at times, because everything to her was presumed as honestly and truthfully presented.  She had no doubting bones, neither would she exhibit distrust.  Every suggestion, every proposition she would deduce as something reliable and worth her faith.  It was our mother who would caution her always; to thread the safe side.  And worst, it would always fall on my lap when things would go haywire for her.  For us, we would always give my sister that wide latitude of advantage and understanding because she was our front runner.  She was in charge of winning for us and in school; she was literally always on top.  That was indication that she was our leader and as such would demand a lot of support and assistance from us.

 

Her capability to focus was exemplary.  The trouble however was that she would care little about herself whenever her mind was concentrated on something.  She had difficulties in determining immediate reality and would always engage in intellectual examination.  Everything for her must have to pass through a formula or else she would just ignore.  Scholars had that attribute of snobbery and my sister was never an exception.  As a matter of fact, she would diplomatically accept something but would rather do what would please her mind.

 

She was more prepared to live in the academe, preferring mind games and all the boring subjects stacked from one row to another.  That was where her excitement manifested, to review, to assess and mentally apply theories.  Going home or staying in her room was never in her itinerary.  She hated the prospects of holidays and anything that disrupted school routine.  She would consider her family and school as one and would interchange her concern and commitment as if there was no difference at all.

She inherited every gene from father, himself a true-blue academician.  She loved her school so much that she had redesigned everything about her according to the standards of her organization.

 

Nothing can unsettle her except one occasion.  This was when her school was proposed to be transferred to another country.  She was a division head of Colombo Plan Staff College, a UN sponsored school for technician education.  The planned relocation would necessitate her dislocation and those of her staff and worst, would send everyone in her organization scouring for employment.  Nonetheless, she accepted the inevitable development and would prepare for the succeeding event.  She encouraged her staff to take higher education, to complete graduate studies so that they all could have a second wind in another educational institution.  My sister enrolled in a doctorate class and was too serious to get across and complete it in due time.  Even at the height of her medication after undergoing a series of radiation exposure due to a debilitating ailment, she would listlessly burn the midnight oil so to speak.

 

She was about to publish all her notes, that which she used as transcript of her lectureships around the world.  She was about to wind up her rendezvous with technician education and commence a new field in criminal justice administration when her time was up.

 

My sister, an extraordinary lady, capped an outstanding career in technology education, a brilliant student, a loving mother, a true friend and a great sibling.  Her departure to another dimension had conferred on us a certain degree of prestige in Heaven and in History.

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About vjtesoro

A perpetual student of Corrections

Posted on November 12, 2012, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Howdy! Would you mind if I share your blog with my zynga group? There’s a lot of folks that I think would really enjoy your content. Please let me know. Cheers

    Like

  2. Reblogged this on PRISON WATCH.

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