BATTLING DIABETES

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New York based scientists found a responsive hormone they intend to develop into a drug to treat diabetes.  This is good news for Filipinos who are predisposed to the disease, which has been passed on genetically, and for some, an effect of dietary abuse.  Filipinos are rice eaters; rice as staple, which is pure sucrose, the source of sugar that could promote diabetes.  It weakens the pancreas—where insulin is produced by beta cells.  Death caused by diabetes is trending and threatening to replace hypertension as the number one killer.

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There are also studies that suggest that Filipinos are also fond of eating bitter gourd or ampalaya, an edible fruit, which is among the most bitter of all fruits.  This is a plant of the tropics and which has been discovered to have strengthening properties favorable to a healthy pancreas.  Provinces in the country like in Northern Luzon where ampalaya is part of their meal never knew any ailment related to pancreas, much more so pertaining diabetes.  But the trend in consuming processed food, courtesy of food chains, lured people to change also their eating habits.  Where ampalaya falls short from the list.  As a consequence, ailment related to a weak pancreas like diabetes has entered the picture.

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Hence, for a diabetic, he needs a shot of insulin to move and work normally in a day.  Without such medical intervention, he feels sluggish, haggard and lethargic.  Worst, a diabetic in effect has high blood sugar which could lead to heart disease, stroke and damage to kidneys, eyes and the nervous system.  A simple bruise may turn into a diabetic wound, an injury difficult to care and treat.  To a large extent, amputation of affected part, like legs and arms, are surgically resorted to in order to arrest the growth of the infection.

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I have a friend who was devastated by diabetes to the extent that both his legs were badly affected.  Both his lower extremities had discolored and almost turning blue.  Blood has thickened that it was no longer circulating properly.  He was sent to the hospital for possible amputation.  It was there where I saw a picture of a dejected person a shadow of a former jovial personality.  I left after a few minutes.  Three months later, I received an invitation from my friend to visit him at home.  I would picture my friend as wheel chair-bound patient and gloomy.  I must borrow courage to stand in front of his gate and as I was ushered to his living room, I was surprised to see my friend, in shorts, with a healthy (real) legs at that about to jump to see me.  He confided to me that after my hospital visit, he would just repair back home to await his fate.  He tried reading books and pamphlets about herbal cures —which I send to him via email and there he came across the effect of muscovado (unprocessed sugar, or as we call in the vernacular, panutsa).  Since he had nothing to lose, or since he was about to lose his legs anyway, he might as well try muscovado.  He had in all his meals where sugar is needed, used muscovado instead.  He would even consume a kilo within a week.  Result:  his legs changed its color to a healthy hue.  A month later, he went for a regular medical check up and his doctor was surprised to note that his diabetes has been cured!  I don’t know if his meal included ampalaya, although I presumed he does because I noticed his garden featured a row of vines of bitter gourd, but his disclosure were more of muscovado.  There is  subsequent cure for those with diabetes indeed.

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For the new generation, there are numerous procedures to undertake without resorting to drugs or waiting breathlessly on the findings of scientists to cure diabetes.  As a matter of fact, it is just a simple routine.  Eat only a small proportion of rice and include into the weekly meal menu an ampalaya.  Don’t forget muscovado too.  And kiss diabetes goodbye.

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About vjtesoro

A perpetual student of Corrections

Posted on April 27, 2013, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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